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deadwords » interviews 24.10.2011
DJ Vadim – Not your average DJ

The following interview was made in 2007 by our author Jens Essmann. It’s an old one which was sadly lost for a long time.
[editor's note]
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DEAD: How was your life in Russia, before you moved to London and why did you choose London? How do you look back on these days, e.g. with nostalgia?

DJ Vadim: I lived in Russia, when I was five years old. I can’t even remember it. And why London? Because I moved with my parents. You don’t have much decision making to do, when you’re five years old. But I went back to St. Petersburg, my hometown, to do shows and that’s amazing.

DEAD: Was it difficult for you to find your way in this new world? Did both regimes have an influence to your music?

You can live in a fascist or communistic country, but that doesn’t matter. I wish we could have that same attitude as adults like we could enjoy life, as if we were five years old.

DJ Vadim: I didn’t speak any English, but as a child you can pick up a language very easily. When you’re five years old, your world is very small, it’s your happy family and your having friends and you have your toys. Everything is tiny, that is great. You can live in a fascist or communistic country, but that doesn’t matter. I wish we could have that same attitude as adults like we could enjoy life, as if we were five years old.

DEAD: Is your music a sort of escape from an adult‘s attitude to feel like a child again?

DJ Vadim: Yeah, I suppose you can say that. As an adult it is important to be inquisitive, open-minded like children, cause when you’re young you want to expand and try things.

DEAD: So – what about the title of your new album “the sound catcher” – does it refer to the expression “eye catcher”?

DJ Vadim: I actually got it from a Steven Spielberg movie called “The Dreamcatcher” and I was fascinated by the title. I just liked the idea of catching dreams. So “the sound catcher” describes me as a DJ, producer, record collector and person, because that’s what I do: catch sounds – sounds from everywhere and putting it into my music. – But there could be still more connotations.

DEAD: Do you have plans with your new album to go on tour with a band like “Russian percussion”?

As an adult it is important to be inquisitive, open-minded like children, cause when you’re young you want to expand and try things.

DJ Vadim: I think I got better over the years to reinterpret studio based music and to go live with it. ONE SELF is continuing, where Russian Percussion stopped. And with my new album I have the same plans to create some other tracks with a band.

DEAD: What is your approach when making music or  looking for samples – are you the typical DJ, who is endlessly digging for records?

DJ Vadim: I would never say: DJ Vadim is your typical DJ. I wouldn’t use that to describe what I do. I try to be unique and original. I’ve been collecting records for more than 15 years. But this album isn’t about going to the basement and collecting dusty records and making an album out of these dusty artifacts that I found and no one else has to present it to the world. That’s not what I want to do. There are other artists who do this very well. To me this album is made out of more kinds of sounds  – sounds from musicians who played the instruments for me, sounds that I recorded, sounds from the kitchen or moving furniture and sounds from records… But it isn’t just sounds: it’s songs. That’s where I see my evolution is going into more song based music.

DEAD: Would you say that you relate to hiphop or do you think there are no exact boarders between genres, because of the effect of sampling, for example?

DJ Vadim: You know, there are two different things – the genre of the CD in a shop and the genre what I think my music is. The genre in a shop is very much dictated by the amount of money the label puts behind you. When you look at the top ten release in hip hop, you can see a bunch of monkeys jumping to big checks – for me music is about the music and not about the money. Otherwise this would mean that I would give up my freedom. I would rather work at Mc Donald’s and make my music at night and sell five copies on myspace. I can’t give up my creativity, because music is my passion. Everything else would be prison to me, if I couldn’t release my album, when and how I want to.

DEAD: I read in your press info the quote of Bernard Shaw: “Some men see things as they are and ask why others dream of things that never were and ask why not.” Have you made all your dreams come true or do you still have targets you want to reach?

DJ Vadim: I’m still searching for that perfect beat, cause I’m hypercritical with my own songs in a perfectionist way. Furthermore, I’d love to start a family, but at the moment I don’t have time.

http://www.djvadim.com/
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Foto(s): djvadim.com
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